Archive for the ‘ILGA’ Category

5th ILGA LGA LAC Conference: Message of the President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva

Brasília, January 28, 2010

Ladies and Gentlemen, I was very honoured to receive the invitation sent to me by the General Coordination of the 5th Conference of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transex and Intersex Association in Latin America and the Caribbean to take part in this important event. Owing to an international journey I am unable to be with you, but thank you for your kind invitation.

To begin, I send my best wishes to all the participants of this conference and my special welcome to the participants from other countries who honour us with their presence. I wish them a pleasant stay among us and trust that they will enjoy our well known Brazilian hospitality.

I have to state that the fight against intolerance and discrimination, and the consequent efforts to respect human nature, including sexual orientation, have guided our Government since its first mandate. At the beginning of our Government, we conferred ministerial status on the Special Secretariat for Human Rights and we created the Special Secretariat for Policies for the Promotion of Racial Equality and the Special Secretariat for Women’s Policies, also with ministerial status, all three of which were intended to articulate their respective efforts with all the other areas of the Government. Care was thus taken to ensure that human rights protection was conceived of as an integrated Government action and, moreover, as a true policy of State, with guaranteed continuity in the event of alternation between political parties in power, something which is natural and even essential to democratic life.

As such, the Special Secretariat from Human Rights, which had already given origin to the Brazil Without Homophobia Programme, approved by us in 2004, prepared the 3rd National Human Rights Plan, launched by our Government last December. Among its strategic objectives, the Plan contains the guarantee of the respect for free sexual orientation and gender identity. Another of its objectives is the reduction of violence motivated by differences of gender, race or ethnic group, age, sexual orientation and situations of vulnerability. As a consequence, policies are proposed which encourage integral women’s health care programmes, taking into consideration their specificities, including sexual orientation.

Aware of our proposals and measures, we are sure that the organizations involved in the fight for the free expression of sexual orientation will continue to progress with their work, which is already achieving good results among us, and which will always have our effective support.

I hope that the debates that will take place here will produce proposals that will contribute to the strengthening of the LGBT segment and also contribute to the enhancement of the Governmental measures that are already being taken at the federal level in Brazil.

Please will you all accept my brotherly embrace.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva
President of the Federative Republic Of Brazil

Hong Kong IDAHO

Forwarded by Peter Tatchell on behalf of IDAHO

Official IDAHO Report – 2009

17 May 2009 – International Day against HOMOPHOBIA & TRANSPHOBIA

MEDIA RELEASE

The fifth International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia, an initiative launched on May 17th 2005 by activist Louis-Georges Tin, saw an amazing outburst of activities around the world. The International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHO) Committee reports on its global site www.idahomophobia.org.

“Actions were reported in more then 50 countries”, said Joel Bedos, coordinator of the IDAHO Committee, the NGO promoting the Day worldwide. “This shows just how strong the global movement is.”

ILGA, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association, a world-wide network of national and local groups with more than 700 member organisations from every continent and representing 110 countries, has been involved in the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia with the IDAHO Committee since it was launched in 2005.

“We chose this Day,” say Gloria Careaga and Renato Sabbadini, ILGA’s Co-Secretaries General, “to launch the third edition of the World Report on State Sponsored Homophobia. With this report ILGA wants to name and shame the States which at the end of the first decade of the 21st century still treat their LGBTI citizens like lesser persons, unworthy of consideration.

“The actions undertaken by activists and the majority of our members all around the world on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia have been an important occasion to remind civil societies and Governments of the situation of lesbians and gays in 80 countries in the world, where homosexuality is considered a crime and of the fact that in 5 of them, i.e. Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Mauritania and Yemen, homosexuals risk the death penalty. ILGA is now working on a State sponsored transphobia report, which we hope to publish by November this year.”

Nicolai Alexeyev, organiser of Slavic Pride in Moscow, speaking after his release from a Russian jail said, “We launched the first Moscow pride and the first IDAHO international conference in 2006 with Louis-Georges Tin, who was with us, on the streets confronting homophobic attacks.

“Since then, we have always been together, working for equal rights in the world. IDAHO breaks down isolation, makes people feel stronger, and sends a powerful signal to all homophobes and transphobes around the world that they are facing not just a handful of activists but millions of people across the globe.”

This ambition to get activists in different countries together is Joel Bedos’ main driving force.

“This year we have got a really large alliance of major regional and international NGOs, including ILGA’s Trans secretariat of course, together to launch a large international campaign against Transphobia. The appeal has been signed by 300 organizations in more than 75 countries, 3 Nobel Prize winners and many international institutions and celebrities and we are now launching it on our websites for citizens all over the world to join in with.”

Most amazingly, this campaign already has led France to announce an historic decision to become the first country in the world to stop classifying Trans people as ‘mentally disordered’ as the World Health Organisation’s guidelines still demand. Also, on May 15th, the Dutch parliament organised a conference on LGBTI rights, celebrating IDAHO, and the Dutch minister of foreign affairs, Maxime Verhagen announced that the Government will change the law that still requires transgender people to undergo irreversible surgery before granting them a new identification document. He acknowledged that the current law violates principle 18 of the Yogyakarta principle: the right to be protected from medical abuses.

The report, presented on Saturday 16 May at the Axel hotel in Barcelona with the help of Coordinadora Gai Lesbiana and former ILGA co-Secretary General Jordi Petit, was prepared by Daniel Ottosson. The report and a map showing the results of the study at a glance can be accessed on www.ilga.org.

“Such an international campaign is one of the added values of the International Day against Homophobia and Transphobia, and we are glad that the IDAHO Committee has provided the initial impulse. It has galvanised us into action and helped us to network with other Trans organisations in other countries. We are definitely stronger together” says Liesl Theron from Gender DynamiX, a South African Human Rights organization promoting freedom of expression of gender identity in Africa.

The IDAHO committee hopes that the Campaign against Transphobia will be just as successful as the one that it launched back in 2006 when an international petition calling “for a universal decriminalisation of homosexuality” drew incredible support from several Nobel prize winners, many high profile politicians, actors, intellectuals, etc, and contributed to the French government taking the initiative that resulted in last year UN Statement on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity -a historical achievement indeed.

On this year’s International Day against Homophobia and Transphobia, the French, Dutch and Norwegian governments organised a World Congress to follow up on this Statement, with a very active participation of the IDAHO Committee along other civil society actors. This congress got many activists from all over the world to meet and strategise the future.

Getting people around the globe together is indeed a shared passion. Kenneth Tan, founder of the first social gay and lesbian network Gays.com, is a happy man: “The community based video that we did this year in partnership with the IDAHO Committee has already been watched by 200,000 people. The idea was to get individuals from a lot of different countries to come out and say they were proud. The result is exactly what the Day means: a celebration of both diversity, because we are all unique, and unity, because there is something that links us all together.”

Diversity is certainly the motto: In mainland China, a bike rally celebrated the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia, while in Hong Kong, the IDAHO Coalition protested against homophobia in front of the Government Headquarters. Says Connie Chan, who has been coordinating actions in Hong Kong for many years: “The International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia Committee and participating organisations around the world have given us inspiration and momentum for action.”

Derek Lennard, IDAHO-UK Coordinator said “In the UK we now have over 100 events and initiatives to mark IDAHO -in 2005 we had five. It is very exciting to see this network get bigger and bigger and to see the very broad support it now receives in the UK”.

While marchers took it to the streets in all major Turkish cities, UK police stations flew the rainbow flag. While in Cameroon, brave activists faced the hostile crowd on a radio programme, a Church service to mark IDAHO was held in Belfast’s oldest church. Iran’s gay students wrote an open letter to the Students’ Union, and in Singapore, the Pink Dot festival was the first-ever event to speak openly about gay and lesbian rights.

The Council of the EU, in a historic statement published on May 17th, declared “Discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity is incompatible with the basic principles on which the UE is founded”. In a surprisingly progressive move, this Statement was supported by countries outside the EU such as Turkey and Ukraine.

“Everywhere we see things moving. Even in Russia where the IDAHO Committee co-organised the first Pride in 2006, things will change. This is why we created this Day in 2005 and we are so happy to see all these actions take place around the globe. We hope that the sum of all these individual energies will increasingly be visible to the world. Because we are so many and so full of hope and energy, that we can really change the world,” says Louis-Georges Tin.

Press contact

Louis-Georges Tin

IDAHO Committee

lgtin@idahomophobia.org

Protests on the 2009 International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia – 17 May

A FEW EXAMPLES…

CHINA & HONG KONG · “Love is not a crime, hate is not a family value” chanted IDAHO coalition marchers as they headed to the Governments Headquarters demanding equal rights for LGBT people.

They called for legislation outlawing discrimination based on sexual orientation and for same-sex couples to be included in the law on domestic violence. Spokesperson Connie Chan reports: “Protesters laid down in a symbolic die-in action to signal their disappointment at the treatment they get from the Hong Kong authorities.”

In the meantime in Beijing, organisations Common Language and Aibai Culture and Education Center organised “Rainbow in Motion”, the Beijing Multi-campus Bike Ride to celebrate gay pride, raise awareness of LGBT rights and introduce IDAHO to the LGBT community and general public of mainland China.

FRANCE · In France, hundreds of events where organised all over the country, where IDAHO enjoys a growing visibility. In Paris, Trans People from all over the world joined French Trans activists and LGBT organisations to “Shout Out against Transphobia”. On that day, the Health minister announced that France would be the first country to officially stop applying WHO classification of Trans People as “mentally disordered”. 27 cities organised debates, film screenings, parties, exhibitions and other political and cultural events, including a National Conference on Transgender and Transexual issues at the French Parliament.

TURKEY · Hundreds of people marched in Ankara and other major cities in the country for LGBT rights. Homophobia and Transphobia have risen dramatically over the last year with dozens of people brutally murdered and police harassment is growing.

ILGA · The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association published on IDAHO the third edition of its report on State Sponsored Homophobia.

The report surveys legislations criminalising consensual sexual acts between persons of the same sex in private over the age of consent in all countries in the World. With this report ILGA wants to name and shame the States which at the end of the first decade of the 21st century still treat their LGBTI citizens like lesser persons, unworthy of consideration.

UK · Amongst many initiatives across the country, dozens of police stations raised a gay rights banner to mark a day of action against homophobia. The organisations raising the rainbow flag high were taking part in The Lesbian and Gay Foundation’s “Flying the Flag” campaign. In London, an IDAHO party launched Day in Hand community project. This campaign’s aim is to inspire and support same-sex couples who want to hold their partner’s hand in public.
www.adayinhand.com

EUROPEAN UNION · To mark IDAHO, the European Union issued a strong statement calling for renewed mobilisation against homophobia and transphobia.

The Statement, warning that “discrimination on the ground of sexual orientation and gender identity is incompatible with the basic principles on which the UE is founded”, was also supported by other States, including Turkey and Ukraine, two countries who did not sign up to the UN Statement last December supported by now 67 countries and calling States to fights discrimination on these grounds.
www.consilium.europa.eu

SINGAPORE · IDAHO 2009 went down in History as the Pink Dot festival united a 2500-strong crowd celebrating the freedom to love. The organisers of the event, pinkdot.sg, say the event was held to commemorate love in all forms and between people of every orientation. The city-state still has a ban on homosexual sex that has been in force since its colonial days under the British. According to Jack Soh of pinkdot.sg, “It was not a protest or a political rally. The event was for Singaporeans in general – to affirm our respect for diversity and the freedom to love, regardless of sexual orientation.” http://www.pinkdot.sg

TRANSPHOBIA · 300 organisations from 75 countries, 3 Nobel Prize winners and intellectuals, artists, politicians from many countries ,supported the International Appeal against Transphobia and for the Respect of Gender Identity launched by a group of large regional and international Human Rights and LGBT Rights organisations. The Appeal was launched on the eve of IDAHO and is now opened to signatures by the public.

A FEW MORE EXAMPLES…

INTERNATIONAL · To coincide with IDAHO, the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs hosted the World Congress on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity. This congress originated from a joint decision by the French, Dutch and Norwegian governments. Its aim was to reflect on future strategies to take the LGBT agenda forward within the UN. Ministers from 15 countries, including 3 African countries, and more than 80 representatives from NGOs from all World regions debated during the day-long congress to elaborate recommendations for all stakeholders.

RUSSIA · Once again Gayrussia tried to organise a Pride march in Moscow on IDAHO. This year, the date coincided with the Eurovision song contest in the Russian capital, which drew increased media attention on the event. In spite of much public attention and support, Moscow authorities cracked down on demonstrators and arrested many members of the group. Gayrussia founder Nicolai Alexeyev promised to hold on to the slogan “Gay Equality; No Compromise” and plans actions for IDAHO 2010.

More information on www.idahomophobia.org

BACKGROUND to IDAHO

In August 2004, Louis-Georges Tin, a French university lecturer, campaigner for Black and LGBT Rights, and chief editor of the Dictionary of Homophobia launched an appeal for a universal recognition of the International Day Against Homophobia (IDAHO). He proposed that this day be fixed on May 17th, to commemorate the World Health Organisation decision to remove homosexuality from the list of mental disorders.

By May 17th 2005, as a result of a year long campaigning effort, 24000 people worldwide and reputed international organisations like ILGA, IGLHRC, the World Congress of LGBT Jews, the Coalition of African lesbians, to name but a few, had signed the IDAHO appeal. In May 2005 already, IDAHO saw some action take place in more than 40 countries in the world. The first LGBT events ever were organised in Congo, China, Bulgaria. Josepp Borrell, President of the European Parliament made a statement supporting the IDAHO and invited Tin to the conference the EU Parliament organised for IDAHO 2006.

By that time a new campaign had been launched by the IDAHO Committee calling “for a universal decriminalisation of homosexuality” and on May 17th 2006 it had attracted support from several Nobel Prize winners (Desmond Tutu, Amartya Sen, Elfriede Jelinek, Dario Fo, José Saramago), artists (Merryl Streep, Cindy Lauper, Elton John, David Bowie), intellectuals (Noam Chomsky, Judith Butler, Bernard-Henri Lévy), NGOs (ILGA, FIDH), politicians, etc…

In July 2006, the Montreal Conference on LGBT Human Rights, organised in the wake of the Outgames, included in its final declaration a strong recommendation to all Governments to recognise May 17th as the International Day against Homophobia.

For IDAHO 2007, the IDAHO committee and Gayrussia co-organised the first GayPride in Moscow, preceded by an International IDAHO conference that brought together many activist, organisations and politicians from around Europe and North America.

At that time, IDAHO had been officially recognised by the EU Parliament, Belgium, the UK and Mexico and organisations in more than 50 countries in the world celebrated IDAHO. Costa Rica, the Netherlands and Luxemburg soon joined the list of countries officially recognising the Day.

On IDAHO 2008, as a result of the actions coordinated by the IDAHO committee, the French Government also recognised IDAHO. Rama Yade, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Human Rights, announced France’s intention to launch a UN initiative towards the universal decriminalisation of homosexuality.

During the second semester, Civil Society organisations, including the IDAHO committee, ILGA, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, ARC international, the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission and many other groups from the global South and East worked towards this initiative that eventually resulted in the December 2008 UN Statement read at the General Assembly by Argentina and supported by now 67 countries. This UN Statement was one of the elements in a long strategy of LGBT advocacy at the UN, a strategy that was discussed on IDAHO 2009 at the World Congress against Homophobia and Transphobia, that the IDAHO committee, as part of a central working group, helped shaping.

ENDS

UPLOAD MEDIA BRIEFING IDAHO 2009

Gays Without Borders

gun9About United Nations Webcast:

2:30 pm Media Stakeout: Maxime Verhagen, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, and Rama Yade, Secretary of State for International Affairs and Human Rights of France.

Letter from Stephen Barris:

Dear all,

The statement on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity is likely to be read Thursday December 18th.

It is impossible at this stage to know at which time it will be given as the agenda depends on the debates that may occur prior to the statement (on a wide range of subjects).

If you want to watch it live, we suggest you

- Open http://www.un.org/webcast/
Select the General Assembly picture below the screen

- Print the agenda

http://www.un.org/ga/third/63/ac363infdoc.pdf

look for agenda item 64(b)

- Follow the webcast regularly to get an idea when the declaration, the counter resolution and a possible debate take place

You can also come back to the site the following days and look for agenda item 64(b) in the archived video for Dec 18

http://www.un.org/webcast/2008.html

Thanks to Vanessa Jackson from ISHR, International Service for Human Rights for the information.

—————————————-

Estimado/as todo/as:

Es probable que jueves 18 de diciembre, se lea la declaración sobre orientación sexual e identidad de género.

En este momento es imposible conocer en qué momento se producirá dado que esto depende de los debates (de una amplia gama de temas) que se produzcan antes de la declaración.

Si desea verlo en directo, puede hacerlo en:

- Abriendo http://www.un.org/webcast/
Seleccione la imagen de la “Asamblea General” en la parte de abajo de la pantalla.

- Imprimiendo la agenda

http://www.un.org/ga/third/63/ac363infdoc.pdf

y mire el tema 64 (b)

- Vea la retransmisión por internet con cierta regularidad para hacerse una idea de cuando tendrán lugar la declaración, la contra-declaración y el posible debate.

- Si lo prefiere, puede visitar la web en los días siguientes y buscar el tema 64 (b) en los archivos del 18 de diciembre:

http://www.un.org/webcast/2008.html

Agradecemos a Vanessa Jackson, del Servicio Internacional para los Derechos Humanos, por la información.

—————————————-

Caríssimos/as,

É provável que a declaração sobre Orientação Sexual e Identidade de Género seja lida quinta-feira 18 de Dezembro.
Neste momento é impossível saber a que hora terá lugar, uma vez que a agenda depende dos debates que possam dar-se antes da declaração (numa vasta gama de temas).

Se quiser assistir à declaração em directo, sugerimos que:

- Abra http://www.un.org/webcast/
Seleccione a foto da Assembleia Geral no fundo do ecrã

- Imprima a agenda

http://www.un.org/ga/third/63/ac363infdoc.pdf

procure pelo item 64(b)

- Siga a transmissão pela internet regularmente, para ter uma ideia de quando a declaração, a contra resolução e um possível debate tenham lugar.

Também pode voltar ao site nos dias seguintes e procure por agenda item 64(b) nos arquivos de vídeo de 18 de Dezembro.
http://www.un.org/webcast/2008.html

Agradeço a Vanessa Jackson da ISHR, Serviço Internacional para os Direitos Humanos, pela informação.

—————————————-

Cheres toutes, chers tous,

La déclaration sur l’Orientation Sexuelle et l’Identité de Genre devrait être lue jeudi 18 décembre.

Il est impossible à ce stade de savoir à quelle heure elle aura lieu, étant donné que l’ordre du jour dépend des débats qui pourront se tenir auparavant (sur une grande variété de sujets).

Si vous voulez la regarder en direct, nous vous suggérons :

- de vous rendre à l’adresse suivante : http://www.un.org/webcast/
Sélectionez l’image de l’Assemblée Générale sous l’écran.

- d’imprimer l’ordre du jour (en anglais)
http://www.un.org/ga/third/63/ac363infdoc.pdf

et de chercher l’article 64(b)

- de suivre régulièrement la diffusion en ligne pour avoir une idée de l’heure à laquelle la déclaration, la contre-résolution et un possible débat auront lieu.

Vous pouvez également retourner sur le site les jours suivants et rechercher l’article 64(b) de l’ordre du jour dans les archives vidéos du 18 décembre :
http://www.un.org/webcast/2008.html

Merci pour cette information à Vanessa Jackson de l’ISHR, de l’ONG Service International des Droits Humains

Stephen Barris
Communication officer

ILGA
International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Association -
Asociación Internacional de Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Trans e Intersex
17 rue de la Charité – 1210 Brussels – Belgium
Tel: +32 (0)2 502 24 71
www.ilga.org

See also:

Gay refugees face prejudice across the world

http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/view.php?id=7403

15th April 2008 18:20
Adam Lake

Biplob Hossain, a gay refugee from Bangladesh who is seeking asylum in Australia, and Joaquin Ramirez, facing deportation to El Salvador, have highlighted the plight of gay men who flee their countries to escape persecution.

Mr Hossain, 25, moved to Australia on a student visa when he was 19.

He applied for asylum on the basis that he would suffer persecution in Bangladesh. He was placed in a detention centre for 29 months.

After three rejections by the Refugee Review Tribunal and a failed High Court bid, Mr Hossain is hoping for a personal intervention from the Minister for Immigration, Senator Chris Evans.

He was released from Villawood Detention Centre in October 2006, but is not allowed to work or collect social security benefits.

Sandi Logan, a spokesperson for the Immigration Department, told Australian SX News:

“A person’s sexual orientation does not of itself enable that person to be granted asylum.”

“We provide protection for asylum seekers under the UN definition of a refugee, under the Convention 67 protocol, which doesn’t include their sexual orientation or their fears of persecution associated with that orientation.”

Bangladeshi law states that gay sex acts are illegal and will be punished with deportation, fines and life imprisonment.

The national law itself is rarely directly enforced however there have been numerous reports of incidents of vigilantism.

People suspected of homosexuality have also been sentenced to death by a fatwa.

Meanwhile, in Canada, a gay man is facing deportation to his native El Salvador where he claims that three police officers who raped him are now out to kill him.

Joaquin Ramirez, a 39-year-old HIV-positive man said the accused perpetrators have visited his family and threatened to kill him because he infected them with the HIV virus.

Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board doubted Mr Ramirez’s claims, asking why he did not seek legal support in his own country when the incident occurred.

Mr Ramirez told Canadian newspaper The Star:

“How could I go to the same people and ask them to protect me when it’s those people who did this to me?”

Mr Ramirez worked as a volunteer outreach worker with the Young Men’s Christian Association and the Salvadoran Network of People Living with HIV.

He said he was picked on by three drunken officers at a restaurant in 2006 and driven to a plantation field where he was allegedly beaten and raped.

Five months later he claims a stranger called his sister and threatened to kill him for infecting them with the virus.

The refugee didn’t believe Ramirez left El Salvador because of the alleged assault as he had already planned to leave in November 2005.

The two stories come just weeks after the much published case of Iranian asylum seeker Mehdi Kazemi.

Mr Kazemi came to London in 2005 to study English but later discovered that his boyfriend had been arrested by the Iranian police, charged with sodomy and hanged.

The UK rejected his first asylum plea, but Home Secretary Jacqui Smith has now granted him a temporary reprieve from deportation while she reconsiders his case.

Last week the International Lesbian and Gay Association released the latest version of their map of LGBT rights across the world.

In 76 countries people face jail for having gay sex.

Homosexual acts officially carry the death penalty in several nations including Saudi Arabia, Iran, Mauritania, northern Nigeria, Sudan, and Yemen.

In many Muslim countries, such as Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria and the Maldives, homosexuality is punished with jail time, fines, or corporal punishment.

In Egypt, openly gay men have been prosecuted under general public morality laws.

Some liberal Muslims, such as the members of the Al-Fatiha Foundation, accept and consider homosexuality as natural pointing out that the Qu’ran speaks out against homosexual lust, and is silent on homosexual love.

However, this position remains highly controversial even amongst liberal movements within Islam, and is considered beyond the pale by mainstream Islam.

The UK is a signatory to the United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, which means that it has a responsibility under international law not to return refugees to a place where they would face persecution.

Full Article Pink News

ilgastatehomophobia.jpg

Full Size Map

African and European LGBT organizations call on all States to fight homophobia and to adopt the Yogyakarta Principles.

Dear friends,

On occasion of the Summit which will gather heads of states from the European Union and from Africa on December 8 and 9 in Lisbon, ILGA, Pan Africa ILGA and ILGA Europe join Solidarité Internationale LGBT to issue the following press release aimed at protesting against State Sponsored Homophobia on the African continent.

We invite LGBT groups from Europe and Africa as well as international NGOs to sign this statement. Please send your agreement to information@ilga.org

Les associations LGBT africaines et européennes demandent à tous les États de combattre l’homophobie et d’adopter les Principes de Jogjakarta.

Chères amies, chers amis,

A l’occasion du sommet qui réunira les chefs d’Etats de l’Union européenne et d’Afrique à Lisbonne les 8 et 9 Décembre prochains, ILGA, Pan Africa ILGA et ILGA Europe s’unissent à Solidarité Internationale LGBT pour diffuser le communiqué de presse ci-joint qui vise à protester contre l’homophobie d’état sur le continent africain.

Nous invitons les groupes LGBT d’Europe et d’Afrique ainsi que les ONGs internationales à signer cette déclaration. Envoyez votre accord à information@ilga.org

Philipp Braun & Rosanna Flamer-Caldera
ILGA International Lesbian and Gay Association

Patricia Prendiville
ILGA Europe

Danilo Da Silva & Linda Baumann
Pan Africa ILGA

Philippe Colomb
Solidarité Internationale LGBT / Inter-LGBT





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